Mark Cuban on Millennials, Equal Pay, College, and Running for President

Billionaire Mark Cuban has many similarities to Donald Trump: He’s rich, he has a big (yuge?) personality, and he’s not afraid to #SpeakOut on all sorts of issues.

Cuban was recently interviewed by CNN’s S.E. Cupp about his views on everything from business regulations to politics. Here are the biggest takeaways from that interview:

On millennials

[Millennials] are the exact same as the kids when I was growing up. Just the toys and sources of media/information are different. We had to spend more time getting info and work harder to find learning tools than kids today. But otherwise, it’s apples to apples. I don’t see any difference.

On soda and cigarette bans

I’m all for personal choice. But with personal choice comes responsibility. We don’t ask people to accept the consequences of a sugar-heavy diet. If you consume high-sugar, high-calorie drinks, great. But don’t expect taxpayers to subsidize the cost of the health and quality-of-life consequences.

It’s not possible or feasible to ask people to opt out of health services if they choose to make bad health choices, so when something truly has no redeeming value, like cigarettes or a large, full-calorie soda, I have no problem placing restrictions on them.

On the minimum wage

Currently, all taxpayers subsidize low-wage earners. Minimum wage employees are most likely to use and require public services, which means we as taxpayers have to pay more in taxes, and those taxes go into programs where our tax money is spent very inefficiently. I would rather have the costs of consumer goods and restaurants – products we as consumers can choose to buy or not buy – go up and the need for public services go down.

On a college affordability

We should put a limit on the amount of federal guarantees available for student loans… Universities and colleges would merge and find themselves forced to be far more effective. The best analogy I can give you is that student loan guarantees are like the easy money that led to the real estate and financial crash six years ago. Schools raise tuition because they know the money is there.

We don’t need new buildings, new cafeterias, new fitness centers on the campus. Let the local markets take care of those. What we need is a reasonable cost of education that doesn’t require students to go into debt.

On Obamacare

I think Obamacare will be less efficient than what private health insurance could offer. However, I think when you add the cost of the inefficiencies of Obamacare plus the savings from better health care for those who would have used taxpayer-supported ad hoc health services, we will have a net positive impact both culturally and financially for the country.

On equal pay

If you are good enough to compete for a top-level corporate job, you should be smart enough to know what the job pays the other gender and negotiate accordingly. If you are an employer and you don’t pay an employee market wages, regardless of gender or orientation, you will end up with what you deserve.

And, finally, on whether he would ever run for president

Hell f***ing no.

Read the full interview here.

About Stephen N. Perkins

view all posts

Stephen N. Perkins envisions a world where individuals are empowered to fulfill their God-given potential, collaborate with others, and take ownership in the well-being and success of their communities. He helps emerging leaders inspire others and influence change. Stephen founded OUTSET in 2014 and currently serves as the network's Editor-in-Chief. He primarily writes about civic and political engagement, education, media, and culture. He also hosts a self-titled podcast on which he speaks to young conservative leaders in activism, business, and media. In addition to OUTSET, Stephen is a communications specialist and leadership coach. Originally from Houston, Stephen now lives and works in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.